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Critics to continue fight against voting law

Lawyers fighting North Carolina’s 2013 voting law promised Monday to continue their efforts after a federal judge decided not to block the law in time for November’s elections.

“In North Carolina, we will have to work harder because of this law,” NAACP attorney Irving Joyner said in a conference call with reporters. “But we remain committed to fighting this voter suppression law.”

U.S. District Judge Thomas Schroeder ruled Friday that November’s election can take place under last year’s law. A full trial is set for next year.

Among other things, the law tightens the window for early voting and makes it harder for people to cast ballots outside of their precincts. Joyner and other attorneys argued that the law disproportionately affects minority voters. Jim Morrill

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