'Homework Hotline' offers free support | MomsCharlotte.com
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'Homework Hotline' offers free support

Homework
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Students at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology are available five nights each week during the school year to provide free math and science tutoring for students in grades 6-12 through the college’s Homework Hotline. The hotline has been offering free sessions by telephone calls, online chats, and e-mail resources since the service’s opening in 1991.

Rose-Hulman students are available between 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. (Eastern Time), Sunday through Thursday, from September through May by calling 1-877-ASK-ROSE (1-877-275-7673) or submitting questions by e-mail and online chat at www.AskRose.org.

Approximately 140 tutors are trained to be on the Homework Hotline staff, with more than 30 available each night at the Homework Hotline’s Communications Center, located in the institute’s Learning Center (basement of the library on campus). Tutors do not give answers, but have been trained to guide callers through homework problems to help them better understand math and science concepts. They have access to current math and science textbooks, and have been specially trained for this assignment.

Funding has been provided by Rose-Hulman and Lilly Endowment, Inc.

HELPFUL HOMEWORK TIPS FROM HOMEWORK HOTLINE STAFF

Homework Hotline staff members offer the following tips to help students get them through the school year:

Learn the Art of Note-Taking -- Key points are usually repeated or written on the board. Be sure to write those items down, make sure to add your own notes for clarification, and leave wide margins so that you may add comments later when reviewing or studying the material.

Discover the True Value of Textbooks -- Textbooks provide much supplemental value to each lesson. Check for highlighted vocabulary, example problems, and additional charts and mini-lessons throughout your book.

Develop Time Management Skills -- Effectively managing your time is vital for success. Keep track of assignment due dates in a planner and set goals for projects and papers.

Locate a Suitable Study Environment -- Find a study area with minimal distractions. Develop a plan for what you want to accomplish in a study session and study difficult subjects first.

Be Honest With Yourself -- Don't wait until you are struggling to seek help. Denying that you are having academic difficulty will only compound your problems later in the course.

Review Information Regularly -- Go back over your notes the each day. Read, highlight, or add information. This can take as little as 15 minutes and will greatly increase the amount of information you remember later.

Every Question is Important -- When stuck on a homework assignment, take the time to identify exactly what is confusing and write down your question. This way, you will remember your question when you go to your teacher or when you call the Homework Hotline for assistance.

Collaborative Learning Improves Morale - If your teacher approves teamwork, then grab a snack and connect with your peers while completing homework assignments or studying for an exam. Just remember the definition for the word collaboration!

Learn From Your Mistakes - After receiving your graded homework assignment, quiz, or test, make sure you know the "why" behind your incorrect answers. The next time you receive a similar problem you will know how to answer it correctly.

Memorization Made Easy Through Silly Tricks - Acronyms and song rhymes can help you study. For example, a high school chemistry teacher may use "LEO goes GER" to remember that losing electrons is oxidation and gaining electrons is reduction.

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