This February 1960 photo shows people taking part in a civil rights sit-in protest at the lunch counter in McCrory’s in Rock Hill. A year later, the Friendship Nine launched the “jail, no bail” strategy at the same place. They were quickly arrested and then convicted trespassing and breach of peace. They opted for a month’s hard labor on a prison farm rather than allow bail or a fine to be posted for them by civil rights groups.
This February 1960 photo shows people taking part in a civil rights sit-in protest at the lunch counter in McCrory’s in Rock Hill. A year later, the Friendship Nine launched the “jail, no bail” strategy at the same place. They were quickly arrested and then convicted trespassing and breach of peace. They opted for a month’s hard labor on a prison farm rather than allow bail or a fine to be posted for them by civil rights groups. The Herald of Rock Hill AP
This February 1960 photo shows people taking part in a civil rights sit-in protest at the lunch counter in McCrory’s in Rock Hill. A year later, the Friendship Nine launched the “jail, no bail” strategy at the same place. They were quickly arrested and then convicted trespassing and breach of peace. They opted for a month’s hard labor on a prison farm rather than allow bail or a fine to be posted for them by civil rights groups. The Herald of Rock Hill AP
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Steve Crump tells of the lunch counter apology that took 54 years

February 02, 2017 1:06 PM

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