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The detective work blaming North Korea for the Sony hacker break-in appears so far to be largely circumstantial, The Associated Press has learned. The dramatic conclusion of a Korean role is based on subtle clues in the hacking tools left behind and the involvement of at least one computer in Bolivia previously traced to other attacks blamed on the North Koreans.

Hollywood loves its overseas villains. Evil forces from Russia, China and North Korea have tirelessly menaced our big-screen heroes in recent years. But, in the wake of the startling cancellation of "The Interview," an entire species of movie baddies might be in danger of extinction.

Programmed as a playful substitute to "The Interview," Trey Parker and Matt Stone's North Korea comedy "Team America: World Police" also has been pulled from theaters.

The Boston Marathon bombings took Rebekah DiMartino's leg, but they couldn't rob her of her joy as a new bride.

Sony's decision to cancel "The Interview" in the face of terrorist threats is already affecting the way Hollywood does business. It has outraged artists, killing their faith in studios to release edgy content. But it's also inspired a rare hush across a usually chatty industry as everyone from moguls to makeup artists takes stock of the scandal and how it could affect their jobs.

New York police say a 5-year-old boy abducted from a home outside Albany has been found dead.

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

Less than two weeks after the ride-hailing app Uber launched in Portland without officials' approval, the company said it is suspending operations for three months to work out its differences with the city.

Hellmann's mayonnaise maker Unilever has withdrawn its lawsuit against the maker of "Just Mayo."

A juror's illness has prompted a Manhattan judge to declare a mistrial for a man accused of stalking R&B star Ashanti.

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