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In between going on a bike ride and taking delivery of a pizza, nurse Kaci Hickox and her boyfriend did chores and watched a movie while state officials struggled to reach a compromise in a standoff that has become the nation's most closely watched clash between personal freedom and fear of Ebola.

A prisoner whose confession helped free a death row inmate in a case that was instrumental to ending capital punishment in Illinois was released Thursday after he recanted, and a prosecutor said there was powerful evidence that the other man was responsible.

Police say up to 2 million Giants fans could turn out to cheer the World Series champions in a downtown San Francisco parade featuring double-decker buses for the players and floats of the Golden Gate Bridge.

Work begins Friday to recover the remains of the four people who died when a small plane crashed into a flight training facility at a Kansas airport, authorities said.

The fiancée of Ebola victim Thomas Eric Duncan is struggling to recover after losing her future husband along with most of her personal belongings, and she says she is effectively homeless due to the lingering stigma of the virus.

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

A terminally ill woman who expects to take her own life under Oregon's assisted-suicide law says she is feeling well enough to possibly postpone the day she had planned to die.

Five football players from a state university in western Pennsylvania were arrested and suspended from the school after police say they beat and stomped a man outside an off-campus restaurant, then fled yelling "Football strong!" The victim was in intensive care Friday with severe brain trauma.

One of Vietnam's most prominent dissidents said he was asked to sign a form seeking a pardon for spreading "propaganda against the state" before his release from prison last week, then forced onto a U.S.-bound flight with just the clothes on his body.

JT Mollner likes to compare haunted house visitors to bungee jumpers and skydivers — they want to be safe, but they also want an adrenaline rush.

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