FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before the Senate Environment Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pruitt is once again understating the threat posed by climate change, this time by suggesting that global warming may be a good thing for humanity. Pruitt has been champion for the continued burning of fossil fuels while expressing doubt about the consensus of climate scientists that man-made carbon emissions are overwhelmingly the cause of record temperature increases observed around the world. In an interview with KSNV-TV in Las Vegas on Feb. 7, Pruitt made several statements that are undercut by the work of climate scientists, including those at his own agency.
FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before the Senate Environment Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pruitt is once again understating the threat posed by climate change, this time by suggesting that global warming may be a good thing for humanity. Pruitt has been champion for the continued burning of fossil fuels while expressing doubt about the consensus of climate scientists that man-made carbon emissions are overwhelmingly the cause of record temperature increases observed around the world. In an interview with KSNV-TV in Las Vegas on Feb. 7, Pruitt made several statements that are undercut by the work of climate scientists, including those at his own agency. Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File AP Photo
FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before the Senate Environment Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pruitt is once again understating the threat posed by climate change, this time by suggesting that global warming may be a good thing for humanity. Pruitt has been champion for the continued burning of fossil fuels while expressing doubt about the consensus of climate scientists that man-made carbon emissions are overwhelmingly the cause of record temperature increases observed around the world. In an interview with KSNV-TV in Las Vegas on Feb. 7, Pruitt made several statements that are undercut by the work of climate scientists, including those at his own agency. Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File AP Photo

AP FACT CHECK: Climate science undercuts EPA chief's view

February 08, 2018 12:33 AM

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