Osyanda Misidjan, 17, washes dishes on the banks of the Coermotibo River in her village of Adjuma Kondre, Suriname. Once surrounded by rainforest, the green palm trees and valley soccer field of the village are now surrounded by stony, bauxite-red plains left over from Alcoa’s mining operations that ceased in 2015.
Osyanda Misidjan, 17, washes dishes on the banks of the Coermotibo River in her village of Adjuma Kondre, Suriname. Once surrounded by rainforest, the green palm trees and valley soccer field of the village are now surrounded by stony, bauxite-red plains left over from Alcoa’s mining operations that ceased in 2015. Stephanie Strasburg/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Osyanda Misidjan, 17, washes dishes on the banks of the Coermotibo River in her village of Adjuma Kondre, Suriname. Once surrounded by rainforest, the green palm trees and valley soccer field of the village are now surrounded by stony, bauxite-red plains left over from Alcoa’s mining operations that ceased in 2015. Stephanie Strasburg/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

A struggling country's past and future is shaped by Alcoa’s aluminum industry

April 24, 2017 02:30 PM