Ask the experts: Company car wrap should have right mix of colors, logos, fonts

05/13/2014 5:14 PM

05/13/2014 5:15 PM

Covering a company vehicle with logos, graphics or contact information can capture the attention of potential customers on the roads, in front of the shop or office and even in parking lots.

But to make sure the wrap on a vehicle is worth the investment, a business owner should follow a few guidelines, said Cora Blinsmon, marketing manager and writer for Capital Wraps in Raleigh.

Before designing a vehicle wrap, either full or partial, a business should have a unique logo, slogan or image to use – something new business owners tend to undervalue, Blinsmon said. “They way underestimate the importance of corporate branding,” she said.

That said, a logo or slogan might not be the best choice as the visual centerpiece of a wrap.

When one company came to Capital Wraps, its wrap featured the huge image of the animal that serves as its logo. But after considering that mothers often were the customers calling the door window and siding business, the company settled on a new wrap featuring a mother with children and a testimonial. The logo remained, just in a smaller size.

“Figure out who it is you want to bring in,” Blinsmon said. “The more specific you can be, the better.”

A wrap also should contain a phone number and website address. Sometimes a business will omit its physical address in order to get calls and website hits from people who might not have bothered looking into a company they knew was based in a different city than where they live.

In the end, “it should absolutely represent the flavor of the company,” Blinsmon said. A hair salon could use neon colors and cursive script, but an accountant or attorney might want something more refined.

For some, a wrapped car can serve as a sort of storefront sign. One of Capital Wraps’ customers was a florist who wanted to bring more attention to her business’ location than her town’s sign ordinance would allow. She found that a bright, flower-covered wrap on a vehicle that was parked all day in front of the store served as a great alternative.

Wraps, which are printed on vinyl and laminated, are applied over a vehicle’s paint. They last about four years, Blinsmon said, and can be removed without damaging the paint. “It’s basically a giant sticker,” she said.

Reach Jamie Kennedy Jones at jamiekennedyjones@gmail.com

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