Mecklenburg County Health Director Marcus Plescia acknowledged Tuesday that the agency’s failure to notify nearly 200 women about abnormal Pap smears was a “significant set-back and embarrassment,” but he denied accusations that patient care at two county-run clinics has suffered and that he created “a culture of fear” in which workers were afraid to report serious problems.
Mecklenburg County Health Director Marcus Plescia acknowledged Tuesday that the agency’s failure to notify nearly 200 women about abnormal Pap smears was a “significant set-back and embarrassment,” but he denied accusations that patient care at two county-run clinics has suffered and that he created “a culture of fear” in which workers were afraid to report serious problems. John D. Simmons jsimmons@charlotteobserver.com
Mecklenburg County Health Director Marcus Plescia acknowledged Tuesday that the agency’s failure to notify nearly 200 women about abnormal Pap smears was a “significant set-back and embarrassment,” but he denied accusations that patient care at two county-run clinics has suffered and that he created “a culture of fear” in which workers were afraid to report serious problems. John D. Simmons jsimmons@charlotteobserver.com

I have not created a 'culture of fear' among county health workers, director says

May 10, 2017 03:52 PM