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  • Read Charlotte text program helps parents and children

    Meagan Robles reads with her daughter Hayden Robles at the University City Library on Harris Boulevard Friday. Meagan Robles is using the text program Read Charlotte to give her daughter crucial learning and literacy skills--it's a new program that sends out texts with helpful tips for parents with children ages 0 to 5.

Meagan Robles reads with her daughter Hayden Robles at the University City Library on Harris Boulevard Friday. Meagan Robles is using the text program Read Charlotte to give her daughter crucial learning and literacy skills--it's a new program that sends out texts with helpful tips for parents with children ages 0 to 5. Diedra Laird The Charlotte Observer
Meagan Robles reads with her daughter Hayden Robles at the University City Library on Harris Boulevard Friday. Meagan Robles is using the text program Read Charlotte to give her daughter crucial learning and literacy skills--it's a new program that sends out texts with helpful tips for parents with children ages 0 to 5. Diedra Laird The Charlotte Observer

Want to get your children reading? Program offers you tips by text

June 16, 2017 3:36 PM

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  • Jail visitation by video "is more secure"

    Mecklenburg County Sheriff's office says the new system is more secure and provides ease of use. Inmate's rights advocates say face-to-face visits, even through glass, provide a connection that video can't.