For the last time, a flight of C-130s departs Charlotte Douglas International Airport on a military mission in February, as the venerable air transports wind down their careers with the N.C. Air National Guard. Charlotte's 145th Airlift Wing was activated on the final mission for the transport aircraft in Operation Freedom's Sentinel, supporting troops in Afghanistan. First flown in 1954, the C-130 is regarded as the most flexible transport ever designed and is used for everything from hauling cargo to serving as gunships to fighting forest fires as airbone tankers. Charlotte's C-130 fleet will be replaced after their retirement with C-17 Globemaster III aircraft.
For the last time, a flight of C-130s departs Charlotte Douglas International Airport on a military mission in February, as the venerable air transports wind down their careers with the N.C. Air National Guard. Charlotte's 145th Airlift Wing was activated on the final mission for the transport aircraft in Operation Freedom's Sentinel, supporting troops in Afghanistan. First flown in 1954, the C-130 is regarded as the most flexible transport ever designed and is used for everything from hauling cargo to serving as gunships to fighting forest fires as airbone tankers. Charlotte's C-130 fleet will be replaced after their retirement with C-17 Globemaster III aircraft. John D. Simmons jsimmons@charlotteobserver.com
For the last time, a flight of C-130s departs Charlotte Douglas International Airport on a military mission in February, as the venerable air transports wind down their careers with the N.C. Air National Guard. Charlotte's 145th Airlift Wing was activated on the final mission for the transport aircraft in Operation Freedom's Sentinel, supporting troops in Afghanistan. First flown in 1954, the C-130 is regarded as the most flexible transport ever designed and is used for everything from hauling cargo to serving as gunships to fighting forest fires as airbone tankers. Charlotte's C-130 fleet will be replaced after their retirement with C-17 Globemaster III aircraft. John D. Simmons jsimmons@charlotteobserver.com

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