A red ant creeps up to a dangling cankerworm on a Bradford pear tree leaf in west Charlotte Thursday, April 9, 2015. The cankerworm quickly rappelled away on its silk before their "face to face" meeting got any closer. The only way to stop the April cankerworm problem is in November or early December by applying a band of paper-like material around the tree and then adding a coat of sticky material. The bands trap the females before they can lay eggs in upper parts of the trees. Over the past 20 years, the cankerworm population in Charlotte has continued to grow, despite aerial spraying in 1992, 1998 and 2008. Repeated defoliation can weaken trees and make them more susceptible to other stresses, such as age, drought, other insects and disease.
A red ant creeps up to a dangling cankerworm on a Bradford pear tree leaf in west Charlotte Thursday, April 9, 2015. The cankerworm quickly rappelled away on its silk before their "face to face" meeting got any closer. The only way to stop the April cankerworm problem is in November or early December by applying a band of paper-like material around the tree and then adding a coat of sticky material. The bands trap the females before they can lay eggs in upper parts of the trees. Over the past 20 years, the cankerworm population in Charlotte has continued to grow, despite aerial spraying in 1992, 1998 and 2008. Repeated defoliation can weaken trees and make them more susceptible to other stresses, such as age, drought, other insects and disease. TODD SUMLIN tsumlin@charlotteobserver.com
A red ant creeps up to a dangling cankerworm on a Bradford pear tree leaf in west Charlotte Thursday, April 9, 2015. The cankerworm quickly rappelled away on its silk before their "face to face" meeting got any closer. The only way to stop the April cankerworm problem is in November or early December by applying a band of paper-like material around the tree and then adding a coat of sticky material. The bands trap the females before they can lay eggs in upper parts of the trees. Over the past 20 years, the cankerworm population in Charlotte has continued to grow, despite aerial spraying in 1992, 1998 and 2008. Repeated defoliation can weaken trees and make them more susceptible to other stresses, such as age, drought, other insects and disease. TODD SUMLIN tsumlin@charlotteobserver.com

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Cankerworms are back in Charlotte

April 10, 2015 2:07 PM

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