Planetoid Pluto is pictured from NASA’s New Horizons as the spacecraft was 476,000 miles from the surface.  This view is dominated by the large, bright feature informally named the “heart,” which measures approximately 1,000 miles across. Even at this resolution, much of the heart’s interior appears remarkably featureless, possibly a sign of ongoing geologic processes, mission specialists say.
Planetoid Pluto is pictured from NASA’s New Horizons as the spacecraft was 476,000 miles from the surface. This view is dominated by the large, bright feature informally named the “heart,” which measures approximately 1,000 miles across. Even at this resolution, much of the heart’s interior appears remarkably featureless, possibly a sign of ongoing geologic processes, mission specialists say. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute
Planetoid Pluto is pictured from NASA’s New Horizons as the spacecraft was 476,000 miles from the surface. This view is dominated by the large, bright feature informally named the “heart,” which measures approximately 1,000 miles across. Even at this resolution, much of the heart’s interior appears remarkably featureless, possibly a sign of ongoing geologic processes, mission specialists say. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Dim, distant Pluto shines in Carolinas astronomers’ eyes

July 15, 2015 02:50 PM