According to businessman Pape Ndiaye, president of the Juneteenth Festival of the Carolinas, this year’s celebration is unique because it will be a homecoming. When Ndiaye started the festival in 1997, about 2,000 people celebrated in his store on Thomas Avenue, the House of Africa. Although it has been celebrated at Independence Park in recent years because of its growth, this year’s festival will be at the House of Africa for the first time in almost a decade.
According to businessman Pape Ndiaye, president of the Juneteenth Festival of the Carolinas, this year’s celebration is unique because it will be a homecoming. When Ndiaye started the festival in 1997, about 2,000 people celebrated in his store on Thomas Avenue, the House of Africa. Although it has been celebrated at Independence Park in recent years because of its growth, this year’s festival will be at the House of Africa for the first time in almost a decade. Kiana Cole
According to businessman Pape Ndiaye, president of the Juneteenth Festival of the Carolinas, this year’s celebration is unique because it will be a homecoming. When Ndiaye started the festival in 1997, about 2,000 people celebrated in his store on Thomas Avenue, the House of Africa. Although it has been celebrated at Independence Park in recent years because of its growth, this year’s festival will be at the House of Africa for the first time in almost a decade. Kiana Cole

Juneteenth Festival will return to its roots

June 16, 2016 02:24 PM

UPDATED June 16, 2016 07:47 PM

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