This is cool ... a respite from July heat

07/29/2014 5:24 PM

07/29/2014 6:03 PM

A mound of relatively cool air has enveloped the Carolinas for the second time in less than two weeks, and forecasters say it could be next week before temperatures return to seasonal levels.

A large area of high pressure spread across the Eastern United States over the past 48 hours, producing record-low temperatures in the North and sending Charlotte’s morning low on Tuesday to 62 degrees – not far from the 59-degree record for the date, set in 1920.

National Weather Service meteorologists said readings likely will be in the low and mid-60s again Wednesday morning.

Afternoon readings also were well below the average high of 89 degrees. The unofficial high Tuesday in Charlotte was 82, and similar temperatures are forecast for Wednesday.

It was even cooler in areas not far from Charlotte on Tuesday morning. Lincolnton had a low of 56 degrees, and it was 57 in Statesville.

This marks the second time in July that a Canadian high pressure system has put a chill – relatively speaking – on midsummer in the Carolinas. From July 16 to 22, temperatures never got above 85 degrees in Charlotte, and it stayed in the 70s on two of those days.

Dry air is responsible for the overnight temperature drops, and forecasters say that condition will continue for a few more days. By Friday or Saturday, winds will veer out of the Southeast, bringing more moisture back into the region.

That also signals the return of shower and thunderstorm chances for the weekend.

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