A divided N.C. Supreme Court threw out the 2014 conviction of a Union County man on Monday, saying Monroe police failed to read Tae Kwon Hammonds his “Miranda” rights when they interviewed after he had been involuntarily committed to a hospital.
A divided N.C. Supreme Court threw out the 2014 conviction of a Union County man on Monday, saying Monroe police failed to read Tae Kwon Hammonds his “Miranda” rights when they interviewed after he had been involuntarily committed to a hospital. Observer file
A divided N.C. Supreme Court threw out the 2014 conviction of a Union County man on Monday, saying Monroe police failed to read Tae Kwon Hammonds his “Miranda” rights when they interviewed after he had been involuntarily committed to a hospital. Observer file

Police didn’t read him his rights in the ER; now his conviction has been thrown out

October 02, 2017 5:36 PM

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