2 each from Gaston, Cabarrus, Union win UNCC Levine scholoarships

05/14/2014 4:48 PM

05/14/2014 5:35 PM

Two students each from Cabarrus, Gaston and Union counties were named Wednesday by UNC Charlotte as Levine Scholars.

No Mecklenburg students were among the group of 16 high school seniors making up the fifth class of Levine Scholars. It marked the second time this spring that Mecklenburg seniors were shut out of a major college scholarship.

The Levine Scholarship pays the entire cost of a four-year education at UNCC, along with a laptop computer and summer experiences. Additional funding is provided to support community service work.

UNCC estimates the value of the awards at $105,000 for in-state students and $155,000 for those outside North Carolina.

Seven Charlotte-area students were winners. They were:

• Quinn Barnette, Belmont South Point High; son of Jennifer and Stephen Barnette.
• Erin Coggins, Concord Jay M. Robinson High; daughter of Stacie and James Coggins.
•  Morgan Flitt, Gastonia Forestview High; daughter of Lu Crompton and Bruce Flitt.
• Daniel Hicks, Kannapolis A.L. Brown High; son of Amy and Jeff Hicks.
• Matthew Lowry, Hickory Christian Academy; son of Dana and David Lowry.
• Esteban Mendieta, Indian Trail’s International Christian Academy; son of Tina and Pablo Mendieta.
• Megan Woody, Indian Trail Porter Ridge High; daughter of Lisa and Bryan Woody.

In addition to being shut out of the Levine Scholarships, no Mecklenburg County students won this spring’s UNC Chapel Hill’s Morehead-Cain Scholarships.

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