Black members of the Charlotte Police Department gathered with NAACP leader Kelly Alexander during a North Carolina NAACP convention in October 1957 in Charlotte. Back row, from left, John Lyles, Rudy Torrence, William J. Costner, Vaudrey Spencer. Front row, from left, George Nash, Kelly Alexander, George Williamson, William Covington. Charlotte’s first black officers in the 1940s were restricted to patrolling black neighborhoods and arresting black suspects, and had to suit up in the department’s basement. The status of black officers started changing in the 1960s, and in 1974 - after a court challenge by a statewide group of black police officers - the police department agreed to promote at least six black officers to sergeant and hire enough blacks to raise their ratio on the force to 20 percent.
Black members of the Charlotte Police Department gathered with NAACP leader Kelly Alexander during a North Carolina NAACP convention in October 1957 in Charlotte. Back row, from left, John Lyles, Rudy Torrence, William J. Costner, Vaudrey Spencer. Front row, from left, George Nash, Kelly Alexander, George Williamson, William Covington. Charlotte’s first black officers in the 1940s were restricted to patrolling black neighborhoods and arresting black suspects, and had to suit up in the department’s basement. The status of black officers started changing in the 1960s, and in 1974 - after a court challenge by a statewide group of black police officers - the police department agreed to promote at least six black officers to sergeant and hire enough blacks to raise their ratio on the force to 20 percent. JAMES PEELER Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room at the Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County.
Black members of the Charlotte Police Department gathered with NAACP leader Kelly Alexander during a North Carolina NAACP convention in October 1957 in Charlotte. Back row, from left, John Lyles, Rudy Torrence, William J. Costner, Vaudrey Spencer. Front row, from left, George Nash, Kelly Alexander, George Williamson, William Covington. Charlotte’s first black officers in the 1940s were restricted to patrolling black neighborhoods and arresting black suspects, and had to suit up in the department’s basement. The status of black officers started changing in the 1960s, and in 1974 - after a court challenge by a statewide group of black police officers - the police department agreed to promote at least six black officers to sergeant and hire enough blacks to raise their ratio on the force to 20 percent. JAMES PEELER Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room at the Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County.

William Covington dies, pioneer black Charlotte police officer and ‘Superman’ to kids

August 10, 2016 07:09 PM

UPDATED August 11, 2016 10:49 AM

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