Byron Vaigneur, 84, of Jackson, S.C., worked at the Savannah River Site for 33 years. He started work in 1954 and retired in 1987. "I wouldn't change a thing in my life," he said. Vaigneur later developed breast cancer and chronic beryllium disease for which he received $350,000 from the federal government.
Byron Vaigneur, 84, of Jackson, S.C., worked at the Savannah River Site for 33 years. He started work in 1954 and retired in 1987. "I wouldn't change a thing in my life," he said. Vaigneur later developed breast cancer and chronic beryllium disease for which he received $350,000 from the federal government. Gerry Melendez McClatchy/The State
Byron Vaigneur, 84, of Jackson, S.C., worked at the Savannah River Site for 33 years. He started work in 1954 and retired in 1987. "I wouldn't change a thing in my life," he said. Vaigneur later developed breast cancer and chronic beryllium disease for which he received $350,000 from the federal government. Gerry Melendez McClatchy/The State

U.S. nuclear workers endure years of misery

December 13, 2015 10:23 AM

UPDATED December 13, 2015 10:23 AM

More Videos

  • The history of sexual harassment in America: five things to know

    Just like many movements for equal rights in America, the path for women to seek recourse from sexual harassment has been through the courts. But grassroots activism in the 1970s opened the space for a nationwide conversation, and the Civil Rights Movement can be credited for building a legal foundation that feminist legal theorists expanded upon to fight sexual harassment. Many of the first lawsuits were brought by African American women like Mechelle Vinson, whose case led to the Supreme Court’s landmark 1986 ruling that employers could be liable for the sexual harassers who preyed on women at their workplace.