Sweepie Rambo, a Chinese Crested Chihuahua, gets a kiss from owner Jason Wurtz after winning the World's Ugliest Dog Competition in Petaluma, Calif., on Friday. Judges in the contest, now on its 28th year, take into account bad appearance, including stench, poor complexion and a host of other inherited and acquired maladies.
Sweepie Rambo, a Chinese Crested Chihuahua, gets a kiss from owner Jason Wurtz after winning the World's Ugliest Dog Competition in Petaluma, Calif., on Friday. Judges in the contest, now on its 28th year, take into account bad appearance, including stench, poor complexion and a host of other inherited and acquired maladies. JOSH EDELSON AFP/Getty Images
Sweepie Rambo, a Chinese Crested Chihuahua, gets a kiss from owner Jason Wurtz after winning the World's Ugliest Dog Competition in Petaluma, Calif., on Friday. Judges in the contest, now on its 28th year, take into account bad appearance, including stench, poor complexion and a host of other inherited and acquired maladies. JOSH EDELSON AFP/Getty Images

SweePee Rambo, blind dog with oozing sore, named World's Ugliest Dog

June 25, 2016 03:32 PM

UPDATED June 25, 2016 04:01 PM

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