FILE - This Dec. 13, 2016 file photo shows flowers, pictures, signs and candles, are placed at the scene of a warehouse fire in Oakland, Calif. A former tenant of an Oakland warehouse says police were called to the unlicensed residence several times to help with evictions, and even knew the leaseholder by name. Jose Avalos, a woodworker who moved into the Ghost Ship two years before a deadly fire killed 36 partygoers a year ago, testified Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, on the second day of a preliminary hearing in Alameda County Superior Court for two men charged with involuntary manslaughter in their deaths.
FILE - This Dec. 13, 2016 file photo shows flowers, pictures, signs and candles, are placed at the scene of a warehouse fire in Oakland, Calif. A former tenant of an Oakland warehouse says police were called to the unlicensed residence several times to help with evictions, and even knew the leaseholder by name. Jose Avalos, a woodworker who moved into the Ghost Ship two years before a deadly fire killed 36 partygoers a year ago, testified Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, on the second day of a preliminary hearing in Alameda County Superior Court for two men charged with involuntary manslaughter in their deaths. Marcio Jose Sanchez, File AP Photo
FILE - This Dec. 13, 2016 file photo shows flowers, pictures, signs and candles, are placed at the scene of a warehouse fire in Oakland, Calif. A former tenant of an Oakland warehouse says police were called to the unlicensed residence several times to help with evictions, and even knew the leaseholder by name. Jose Avalos, a woodworker who moved into the Ghost Ship two years before a deadly fire killed 36 partygoers a year ago, testified Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, on the second day of a preliminary hearing in Alameda County Superior Court for two men charged with involuntary manslaughter in their deaths. Marcio Jose Sanchez, File AP Photo

Ex-tenant says police visited Oakland warehouse before fire

December 07, 2017 07:05 PM

UPDATED December 07, 2017 07:06 PM

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