James Bennett holds a sign at a rally for coal industry jobs on Wednesday next to the Coal Miner's Statue at the state Capitol complex in Charleston, W.V. The rally coincided with a day trip to Charleston from President Barack Obama to talk about drug abuse. Speakers at the rally criticized Obama's proposed environmental rules that would limit carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants.
James Bennett holds a sign at a rally for coal industry jobs on Wednesday next to the Coal Miner's Statue at the state Capitol complex in Charleston, W.V. The rally coincided with a day trip to Charleston from President Barack Obama to talk about drug abuse. Speakers at the rally criticized Obama's proposed environmental rules that would limit carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants. John Raby Associated Press
James Bennett holds a sign at a rally for coal industry jobs on Wednesday next to the Coal Miner's Statue at the state Capitol complex in Charleston, W.V. The rally coincided with a day trip to Charleston from President Barack Obama to talk about drug abuse. Speakers at the rally criticized Obama's proposed environmental rules that would limit carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants. John Raby Associated Press

Whiplash: Shift in federal coal policies stokes fear in rural areas

October 24, 2015 02:18 AM

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