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  • Tennessee family battles HOA after daughter is nearly strangled

    The Meekers represent a growing number of vocal residents upset with their homeowners associations. While many HOAs still support their residents, others now harass them with narrow and odd rules. Fines for violating those rules can be heavy, leading to liens against residents and even loss of their homes.

The Meekers represent a growing number of vocal residents upset with their homeowners associations. While many HOAs still support their residents, others now harass them with narrow and odd rules. Fines for violating those rules can be heavy, leading to liens against residents and even loss of their homes. Joe Ledford and Monty Davis The Kansas City Star
The Meekers represent a growing number of vocal residents upset with their homeowners associations. While many HOAs still support their residents, others now harass them with narrow and odd rules. Fines for violating those rules can be heavy, leading to liens against residents and even loss of their homes. Joe Ledford and Monty Davis The Kansas City Star

HOAs from hell: Homes associations that once protected residents now torment them

August 03, 2016 07:57 AM

UPDATED August 09, 2016 11:22 AM

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  • The history of sexual harassment in America: five things to know

    Just like many movements for equal rights in America, the path for women to seek recourse from sexual harassment has been through the courts. But grassroots activism in the 1970s opened the space for a nationwide conversation, and the Civil Rights Movement can be credited for building a legal foundation that feminist legal theorists expanded upon to fight sexual harassment. Many of the first lawsuits were brought by African American women like Mechelle Vinson, whose case led to the Supreme Court’s landmark 1986 ruling that employers could be liable for the sexual harassers who preyed on women at their workplace.