In this undated photo provided by the U.S. Air Force, Brig. Gen. Kenneth N. Walker, commanding general of a bomber command in the Southwest Pacific, poses for a photo in front of his tent-office in the field. Nearly 75 years after his father disappeared during a bombing mission over a remote Pacific island, Douglas Walker, the son of the highest-ranking recipient of the Medal of Honor still listed as missing from World War II, is pushing for renewed interest in finding the crash site and the remains of the crew.
In this undated photo provided by the U.S. Air Force, Brig. Gen. Kenneth N. Walker, commanding general of a bomber command in the Southwest Pacific, poses for a photo in front of his tent-office in the field. Nearly 75 years after his father disappeared during a bombing mission over a remote Pacific island, Douglas Walker, the son of the highest-ranking recipient of the Medal of Honor still listed as missing from World War II, is pushing for renewed interest in finding the crash site and the remains of the crew. USAF AP Photo
In this undated photo provided by the U.S. Air Force, Brig. Gen. Kenneth N. Walker, commanding general of a bomber command in the Southwest Pacific, poses for a photo in front of his tent-office in the field. Nearly 75 years after his father disappeared during a bombing mission over a remote Pacific island, Douglas Walker, the son of the highest-ranking recipient of the Medal of Honor still listed as missing from World War II, is pushing for renewed interest in finding the crash site and the remains of the crew. USAF AP Photo

After nearly 75 years, son seeks crash site of WWII hero

November 10, 2017 12:33 PM

UPDATED November 10, 2017 12:34 PM

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