Deep-sea sharks, like this great white, have livers that produce concentrated amounts of omega-2 oil squalene – a lighter-than-water compound that helps it float. The high demand for squalene causes excessive shark hunting. But a biotech firm with offices in North Carolina is developing an alternate high-yield source for squalene: tobacco.
Deep-sea sharks, like this great white, have livers that produce concentrated amounts of omega-2 oil squalene – a lighter-than-water compound that helps it float. The high demand for squalene causes excessive shark hunting. But a biotech firm with offices in North Carolina is developing an alternate high-yield source for squalene: tobacco. Greg Skomal NOAA, via AP
Deep-sea sharks, like this great white, have livers that produce concentrated amounts of omega-2 oil squalene – a lighter-than-water compound that helps it float. The high demand for squalene causes excessive shark hunting. But a biotech firm with offices in North Carolina is developing an alternate high-yield source for squalene: tobacco. Greg Skomal NOAA, via AP

Saving sharks ... with NC tobacco

October 25, 2015 03:30 AM