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  • First openly transgender woman running for public office in Johnston County is also a disabled veteran and struggles to be accepted

    Wendy Ella May, a disabled veteran, has been a fire fighter, EMT, paramedic and farmer and is currently running for county commissioner in Johnston County, N.C. She is the first openly transgender woman to run for public office there and campaigns from town to town facing a mix of opposition and openness.

Wendy Ella May, a disabled veteran, has been a fire fighter, EMT, paramedic and farmer and is currently running for county commissioner in Johnston County, N.C. She is the first openly transgender woman to run for public office there and campaigns from town to town facing a mix of opposition and openness. Justine Miller jmiller@mcclatchy.com
Wendy Ella May, a disabled veteran, has been a fire fighter, EMT, paramedic and farmer and is currently running for county commissioner in Johnston County, N.C. She is the first openly transgender woman to run for public office there and campaigns from town to town facing a mix of opposition and openness. Justine Miller jmiller@mcclatchy.com

Johnston: After man maligned District 2 candidate, transgender woman told him – I’m the candidate

October 10, 2016 04:00 PM

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  • Retired football coach of four decades lowered American flags to half-staff in Ashe County after the Orlando nightclub shooting

    Roy Carter said he is very proud of his openly gay son and has always had a progressive mind, despite living in North Carolina's rural and mostly conservative High Country all his life. After 49 people were killed at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla. in June, he noticed that many government buildings in his local Ashe County were not complying with President Obama's directive to lower American flags to half-staff in honor of the victims. Carter took it upon himself to drive from a fire station to a post office and even private businesses lowering flags as he went.