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Hot air balloons take to the air in Statesville 1:02

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Carolina Panthers tight end Greg Olsen walking without boot at Soldier Field 0:29

Carolina Panthers tight end Greg Olsen walking without boot at Soldier Field

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North Carolina Conjoined twins separated in rare surgery

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Panthers Rivera likes the play calls but team has to make plays

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Charlotte Hornets' Dwight Howard still a big kid at heart

  • First openly transgender woman running for public office in Johnston County is also a disabled veteran and struggles to be accepted

    Wendy Ella May, a disabled veteran, has been a fire fighter, EMT, paramedic and farmer and is currently running for county commissioner in Johnston County, N.C. She is the first openly transgender woman to run for public office there and campaigns from town to town facing a mix of opposition and openness.

Wendy Ella May, a disabled veteran, has been a fire fighter, EMT, paramedic and farmer and is currently running for county commissioner in Johnston County, N.C. She is the first openly transgender woman to run for public office there and campaigns from town to town facing a mix of opposition and openness. Justine Miller jmiller@mcclatchy.com
Wendy Ella May, a disabled veteran, has been a fire fighter, EMT, paramedic and farmer and is currently running for county commissioner in Johnston County, N.C. She is the first openly transgender woman to run for public office there and campaigns from town to town facing a mix of opposition and openness. Justine Miller jmiller@mcclatchy.com

Johnston: After man maligned District 2 candidate, transgender woman told him – I’m the candidate

October 10, 2016 4:00 PM

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Panthers Ron Rivera: 'Three plays cost us the game' 0:45

Panthers Ron Rivera: 'Three plays cost us the game'

Cam Newton had his moments on Sunday, says Coach Rivera 0:25

Cam Newton had his moments on Sunday, says Coach Rivera

Panthers Ron Rivera: I wanted points ... touchdowns vs. Bears 0:27

Panthers Ron Rivera: I wanted points ... touchdowns vs. Bears

Hot air balloons take to the air in Statesville 1:02

Hot air balloons take to the air in Statesville

Charlotte Hornets forward Michael Kidd-Gilchrist back at practice after two weeks 0:33

Charlotte Hornets forward Michael Kidd-Gilchrist back at practice after two weeks

Carolina Panthers tight end Greg Olsen walking without boot at Soldier Field 0:29

Carolina Panthers tight end Greg Olsen walking without boot at Soldier Field

Hornets Dwight Howard plays key role in home opener win 1:28

Hornets Dwight Howard plays key role in home opener win

North Carolina Conjoined twins separated in rare surgery 2:16

North Carolina Conjoined twins separated in rare surgery

Panthers Rivera likes the play calls but team has to make plays 0:23

Panthers Rivera likes the play calls but team has to make plays

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  • Retired football coach of four decades lowered American flags to half-staff in Ashe County after the Orlando nightclub shooting

    Roy Carter said he is very proud of his openly gay son and has always had a progressive mind, despite living in North Carolina's rural and mostly conservative High Country all his life. After 49 people were killed at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla. in June, he noticed that many government buildings in his local Ashe County were not complying with President Obama's directive to lower American flags to half-staff in honor of the victims. Carter took it upon himself to drive from a fire station to a post office and even private businesses lowering flags as he went.