Save Money in this Sunday's paper

In a study published this week in the journal Plos One, researchers at the University of California, San Diego experimented with dogs to see whether they, like humans, were hard-wired for jealousy. If so, the researchers suggested that human and canine jealousy might exist for similar “primordial” reasons.

Overwhelmed by severe drought, the Oklahoma legislature passed a law this year to help communities make the most of their water resources by treating and reusing wastewater.

Blue whales cluster for long periods of time in the busy Pacific Ocean shipping lanes off the California coast, raising concern about collisions between vessels and the endangered marine mammals, a new study has found.

Done right, landscaping can do much more than attract compliments and boost your property value. It can help you repel intruders, both human and natural.

When heat, humidity and dry days take a toll on your flowers in July and August, given your yard a fresh look with pots of tropical hibiscus and mandevilla. Although they are not cold hardy in much of the country, these plants add tropical touches to any summer decor. Costa Farms, a major hibiscus and mandevilla grower, features these stunning, sun-loving bloomers at garden centers, including Home Depot, Lowe's and Wal-mart nationwide, $19.99-$35.99, depending on size and plant:

The Wicked Audio Divvy lets two people listen to the same iPod, smartphone or tablet, with independent volume control

A progressive business advocacy group said that small business owners from around the country support greater efforts by the federal government to protect the nation’s water, according to a poll the group commissioned.

The head of the Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday strongly defended the approach and legitimacy of an Obama administration power plant rule that Republicans attacked as regulatory overreach and Democrats said was vital.

In early July, a million gallons of salty drilling waste spilled from a pipeline onto a steep hillside in western North Dakota's Fort Berthold Reservation. The waste - a byproduct of oil and gas production - has now reached a tributary of Lake Sakakawea, which provides drinking water to the reservation.

In early July, a million gallons of salty drilling waste spilled from a pipeline onto a steep hillside in western North Dakota's Fort Berthold Reservation. The waste - a byproduct of oil and gas production - has now reached a tributary of Lake Sakakawea, which provides drinking water to the reservation.

Next Page »

Quick Job Search
CharlotteObserver.com