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A federal appeals court Tuesday upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's first-ever limits on air toxics, including emissions of mercury, arsenic and acid gases, preserving a far-reaching rule the White House had touted as central to President Barack Obama's environmental agenda.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit on Tuesday upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's first-ever limits on air toxins, including emissions of mercury, arsenic and acid gases, preserving a far-reaching rule the White House had touted as central to President Barack Obama's environmental agenda.

The following editorial appeared in the Miami Herald on Monday, April 14:

Drilling at several natural gas wells in southwestern Pennsylvania released methane into the atmosphere at rates that were 100 to 1,000 times higher than federal regulators had estimated, new research shows.

Cementing protection for one of the largest privately owned pieces of land on California's 1,100-mile coastline, a San Francisco environmental group on Monday donated to the public the Coast Dairies property - a pastoral expanse of rolling meadows, redwood forests and panoramic ocean views north of Santa Cruz.

The leatherback turtle’s instincts, particularly for long-distance travel, bring it in conflict with one of humankind’s ancient activities: fishing.

I’ve noticed a lot more robins staying in my area during the winter in recent years. Why do some stay and some fly south?

In a north London hospital, British scientists are growing noses, ears and blood vessels in the laboratory in a bold attempt to make body parts using stem cells.

Put under stress through physical exertion – such as long-distance walking or running – human bones gain in strength as the fibers are added or redistributed according to where strains are highest. Because the structure of human bones can inform us about the lifestyles of the individuals, they can provide valuable clues for biological anthropologists. Research by Alison Macintosh, a doctoral candidate at Britain’s Cambridge University, shows that after the emergence of agriculture in Central Europe from around 5300 B.C., the bones of those living in the fertile soils of the Danube river valley became progressively less strong.

NC State University engineering students compete in programmed drone flight at Centennial Campus.

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