Meet the five new members of the NASCAR Hall of Fame

05/21/2014 4:56 PM

05/21/2014 7:03 PM

A quick look at the five newest members of the NASCAR Hall of Fame:

Bill Elliott

In a 37-year driving career, Bill Elliott’s 44 wins rank 16th all-time, and his 55 poles rank eighth. But his most prestigious accomplishment came in 1988 when he won the NASCAR Cup series championship with six wins, 15 top-five and 22 top-10 finishes in 29 races. In addition, he won a record 16 Most Popular Driver Awards.

Fred Lorenzen

Fred Lorenzen was one of NASCAR’s first true superstars even though he was a part-time driver, never running more than 29 of the season’s 50-plus races. Lorenzen got his start in NASCAR as a mechanic with the famed Holman-Moody team in 1960 but was elevated to lead driver by the end of the year.

Wendell Scott

Wendell Scott was the first African-American to race full time in NASCAR’s premier series, as well as the first to win a premier series race. Scott posted 147 top 10s and 495 starts during his 13-year career. He won more than 100 races at local tracks before making his premier series debut, including 22 races at Southside Speedway in Richmond, Va.

Joe Weatherly

Joe Weatherly won two championships (1962-63) and 25 races in NASCAR’s premier series. A decade earlier in 1952-53, he won 101 races in the NASCAR Modified division, capturing the championship in 1953. He even tried his hand in NASCAR’s short-lived Convertible Division from 1956-59 winning 12 times.

Rex White

Consistency was the hallmark of Rex White’s NASCAR career. He finished among the top five in nearly a half of his 233 races and outside the top 10 only 30 percent of the time. White was a short-track specialist in an era in which those tracks dominated the schedule. Of his 28 career wins in NASCAR’s premier series, only two came on tracks longer than a mile in length.

Source: NASCAR

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