Books

In ‘A Full Life,’ Jimmy Carter at 90 remains a wise truth teller

Former President Jimmy Carter hands a copy of his new book "A Full Life: Reflections at Ninety," to Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter, Friday, July 10, 2015, at the Free Library in Philadelphia. Carter, a Nobel peace laureate who turned 90 last year, left office in 1981 and has had the longest post-presidential life in American history. He also is a prolific post-presidential author, with more than 20 books, including memoirs, poetry and policy books.
Former President Jimmy Carter hands a copy of his new book "A Full Life: Reflections at Ninety," to Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter, Friday, July 10, 2015, at the Free Library in Philadelphia. Carter, a Nobel peace laureate who turned 90 last year, left office in 1981 and has had the longest post-presidential life in American history. He also is a prolific post-presidential author, with more than 20 books, including memoirs, poetry and policy books. AP

Jimmy Carter’s new book, “A Full Life: Reflections at 90,” is a warm and detailed memoir of his youth followed by a clear-eyed assessment of the issues he tackled as president and afterward. This refusal to sugarcoat matters is quintessential Carter; he has maintained all the acuity and principle of his youth while accruing the wisdom of his 90 years.

One challenge of Carter’s presidency was that he spoke the truth, even though during his years in the White House (1976-80), the truth was often bad news. He faced an energy crisis, a capsizing economy, opposition from Congress, and the revolution in Iran than led to American hostages being held captive 444 days.

Carter revisits some of those challenges in the book, in chapters titled “Issues Mostly Resolved” and “Problems Still Pending.” Resolved issues include swift and cogent sections on Rhodesia, the B-1 bomber, “Saving New York City and Chrysler,” and the Cold War – he doesn’t take credit for its end, but it gives him a chance to talk about his landmark SALT II Treaty. Among “Problems Still Pending” are drugs, special interests, the threat of nuclear war and intelligence agencies. He doesn’t let Ronald Reagan, George H.W. or George W. Bush or Bill Clinton off completely, but when they appear, his language about them is carefully neutral.

“I try not to be critical of others who’ve done differently from me,” Carter says by phone, “but in a positive way spell out the things that might be done more effectively, more honestly, more beneficially to our own people and people in the rest of the world.”

In “A Full Life,” in addition to providing a sweeping overview of a broad range of issues and frequent credit to his wife Rosalynn, he remembers his pre-political past, including surprisingly detailed stories about tilling a field with a mule at the family farm in Plains, Ga., and an incident when, as a sailor, he was swept off the deck of a submarine near South Korea and almost carried off to sea.

At the heart of the book is a message that Carter has carried through his political life: “My hope is that our leaders will capitalize on our country’s most admirable qualities,” he writes. His version of those qualities, deeply informed by his Christian faith, seems far from our current foreign policy. “We need to be a Superpower as a champion of peace, not war; we need to be a Superpower in being a champion of basic human rights, although we’re now violating a good many of the basic principles of human rights,” he says. “We need to be the most generous country in the world; the most dedicated to the essence of democracy and freedom.”

When pressed, the avowed truth teller admits that we have a long way to go. “Most people on earth look on our country as the number one proponent of war. Since the Second World we’ve invaded or bombed about 30 nations in the world. ... But I think that we should be a champion of peace, and a champion of human rights, and a champion of democracy, and a champion of freedom, a champion of generosity, a champion of environmental quality.”

In “A Full Life,” Carter puts the long arc of his story together the way he sees it. The book includes his accomplishments as a negotiator and peacemaker in the humblest way – as a man who was at work on a larger project, something he continues to be. A primer for the generations who don’t know his work and a personal retelling for those who do, “A Full Life” may herald the reappraisal he deserves.

Non-fiction

A Full Life: Reflections at 90

Jimmy Carter

Simon & Schuster, 272 pages

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