Reading Matters

Five (more) books I can’t wait to read

“THE MARRIAGE LIE, a novel by Kimberly Belle. If it was such a good marriage, why did the husband lie about where he was going? This is the question that sends Iris scurrying for answers. Set in Atlanta by a graduate of Agnes Scott. Kirkus Reviews calls Belle’s third novel “a compelling adventure.” P.S. Iris and Will have just begun trying for their first baby. Due late December.

“SELECTION DAY, a novel by Aravind Adiga. A single-room shack on the edge of the city of Mumbai and two brothers, who would be social outcasts if not for their prowess at cricket. But the day that 14-year-old Manju meets his older (and better looking and more skilled ) brother’s rival -- a boy both privileged and confident -- Manju must face up to who he really is. By the author of “The White Tiger,” winner of the 2008 Man-Booker Prize. Due in January.

“PERFECT LITTLE WORLD,” a novel by Kevin Wilson. Isabelle Poole, just out of high school, is pregnant with her art teacher’s child. Dr. Preston Grind, a borderline PTSD cutter, is a child psychologist who has spent his life studying family. Isabelle becomes Grind’s muse, and he convinces her to allow him to raise her son in a commune in which none of the 10 children know which parent belongs to which child. Late January.

“DIFFERENT CLASS,” a novel by Joanne Harris. When a boy, 20 years later, still haunts his Latin master’s dreams at an English boarding school, you know you’re in for a ride. Joanne Harris is the author of “Chocolat,” made into a film starring Juliette Binoche and Johnny Depp. January.

THE BLOOD OF EMMETT TILL,” by Timothy Tyson (“Blood Done Sign My Name”) is part-detective story, part political thriller about the 14-year-old black boy from Chicago who (harmlessly) violated racial taboos one Sunday morning in the Mississippi Delta and was tortured to death and his body hurled into the river. Tyson tells the story of how black power and a mother’s courage challenged the atrocities in America’s enduring caste system.

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