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Family's unity is an art form

When you walk down the hallway of the King Tiger Academy Tae Kwon Do School, you see a mingle of mothers with babies, children ages 4-17, young adults, and adults of all ages.

Everyone bows to one another in hello and respect, and “Ma'am,” and “Sir” are heard. Master Terrance Evins, the head instructor, likes to say that “Families that kick together, stay together.”

Paul Allen, a father of three, concurs. He heard about the school via a neighbor whose son attended the after-school program at King Tiger. Allen was looking for a sports program that focused on physical development, character skills and building self-confidence.

After his daughters started taking classes, he noticed “an immediate improvement in their attitudes, confidence and commitment to something.” He also realized that learning a martial art was an activity he always wanted to do, so he joined his daughters in the school and was recently asked to participate in a special Masters Class.

Like her father, 8-year-old Taylor Allen has been invited to attend a special Character Class that will enable her to help younger students as she progresses.

She affirms that she “works really hard, gets sweaty, and likes doing the special moves and patterns.”

Her 6-year-old sister, Kayla, says she enjoys her friends in the class and how everyone helps one another – as she practices a flying hammer fist and says hello in Korean.

Courtesy, integrity, perseverance, self-control and an indomitable spirit are the precepts of the King Tiger Academy. The school practices a combination of physical activity, mental activity, self-discipline, character building and respect for self and others.

“Training and reaching goals in the martial arts can never be taken away from someone, and is physical activity that can continue throughout one's lifetime,” says Evins, whose 22 years of study began at age 6.

That is clearly the case for the Allen family. Shortly after Paul Allen began classes, his wife, Charlotte, also started.

“First, it's definitely a workout,” she said. “Second, it's something that I can do on my own and at the same time practice with my children and my husband. We're learning the same patterns, kicks and punches. I'm helping the kids with the right moves rather than having to guess at what they're trying to do.”

It didn't take long to get the last family member involved. Four-year-old Jake is adorable in his white workout suit, tied with a white belt decorated by four stripes for mastering patterns and moves. Jake dances around the floor mat, punches at imaginary foes, recites eight numbers in Korean, and makes it clear that he needs two more stripes to take his test.

Evins' goals for the school are straightforward, and he sums them up as “SSL”: Sweat, Smile, and Learn.

He wants everyone at the school to work hard, set goals, learn about themselves and others, and have fun in a family-centered environment.

When you walk down the hallway of the King Tiger Academy Tae Kwon Do School, you see a mingle of mothers with babies, children ages 4-17, young adults, and adults of all ages.

Everyone bows to one another in hello and respect, and “Ma'am,” and “Sir” are heard. Master Terrance Evins, the head instructor, likes to say that “Families that kick together, stay together.”

Paul Allen, a father of three, concurs. He heard about the school via a neighbor whose son attended the after-school program at King Tiger. Allen was looking for a sports program that focused on physical development, character skills and building self-confidence.

After his daughters started taking classes, he noticed “an immediate improvement in their attitudes, confidence and commitment to something.” He also realized that learning a martial art was an activity he always wanted to do, so he joined his daughters in the school and was recently asked to participate in a special Masters Class.

Like her father, 8-year-old Taylor Allen has been invited to attend a special Character Class that will enable her to help younger students as she progresses.

She affirms that she “works really hard, gets sweaty, and likes doing the special moves and patterns.”

Her 6-year-old sister, Kayla, says she enjoys her friends in the class and how everyone helps one another – as she practices a flying hammer fist and says hello in Korean.

Courtesy, integrity, perseverance, self-control and an indomitable spirit are the precepts of the King Tiger Academy. The school practices a combination of physical activity, mental activity, self-discipline, character building and respect for self and others.

“Training and reaching goals in the martial arts can never be taken away from someone, and is physical activity that can continue throughout one's lifetime,” says Evins, whose 22 years of study began at age 6.

That is clearly the case for the Allen family. Shortly after Paul Allen began classes, his wife, Charlotte, also started.

“First, it's definitely a workout,” she said. “Second, it's something that I can do on my own and at the same time practice with my children and my husband. We're learning the same patterns, kicks and punches. I'm helping the kids with the right moves rather than having to guess at what they're trying to do.”

It didn't take long to get the last family member involved. Four-year-old Jake is adorable in his white workout suit, tied with a white belt decorated by four stripes for mastering patterns and moves. Jake dances around the floor mat, punches at imaginary foes, recites eight numbers in Korean, and makes it clear that he needs two more stripes to take his test.

Evins' goals for the school are straightforward, and he sums them up as “SSL”: Sweat, Smile, and Learn.

He wants everyone at the school to work hard, set goals, learn about themselves and others, and have fun in a family-centered environment.

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