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Targets for annexation include bit of Cabarrus

Eager-to-grow Charlotte is moving ahead to gobble up several chunks of Mecklenburg County – and a bump of Cabarrus – in a multi-layered process that could bring thousands of residents and acres into the city limits.

The six sections being considered are on all sides of the city, totaling 11.1 square miles and 18,700 residents.

Five are in the University City and western Mecklenburg areas: Berewick, in southwest Mecklenburg; Eastfield in northeast Mecklenburg; Spring Park in northeast Mecklenburg; and Hood Road South and Hood Road North in the eastern part of the county.

Most notable are 4,520 acres in the Hood Road area of eastern Mecklenburg. The Eastfield area includes a sliver of Cabarrus County in the Highland Creek development. It's the first attempt by Charlotte to annex land in another county.

Late last month, City Council members approved a “resolution of intent” to begin the annexation process, which will include a public informational session in September and public hearing in October.

Charlotte explores annexation every two years; it's important to keep the city healthy, Charlotte-Mecklenburg planner Bryman Suttle said. In 2007, the city added 4.7 square miles, affecting about 7,100 residents.

If approved, the areas considered now would be annexed in 2009, adding $1.5 billion in real and personal property. It would also allow Charlotte to top the 700,000 population mark, with about 715,500 residents.

Each area meets the legal criteria for annexation, with increasing population density and at least part of each section already connected to the city boundary, Suttle said.

“It's important to stress that this is just the beginning of the process; nothing's been decided,” Suttle said.

“We encourage people to come out and ask questions at these hearings. That's what they're for.”

If annexation is eventually approved, the city would immediately extend police protection, city water and sewer, garbage collection and street maintenance to those areas – and that would bring more development.

Suttle said development and population density drive many areas to qualify for annexation. Often, services such as volunteer fire departments or private garbage collectors can't keep up with demand as more houses are built and more people move into an area.

“When you get to a certain size, you want to be sure those things can be taken care of,” Suttle said.

“You can have unintended circumstances if there's a lack of services.”

Eager-to-grow Charlotte is moving ahead to gobble up several chunks of Mecklenburg County – and a bump of Cabarrus – in a multi-layered process that could bring thousands of residents and acres into the city limits.

The six sections being considered are on all sides of the city, totaling 11.1 square miles and 18,700 residents.

Five are in the University City and western Mecklenburg areas: Berewick, in southwest Mecklenburg; Eastfield in northeast Mecklenburg; Spring Park in northeast Mecklenburg; and Hood Road South and Hood Road North in the eastern part of the county.

Most notable are 4,520 acres in the Hood Road area of eastern Mecklenburg. The Eastfield area includes a sliver of Cabarrus County in the Highland Creek development. It's the first attempt by Charlotte to annex land in another county.

Late last month, City Council members approved a “resolution of intent” to begin the annexation process, which will include a public informational session in September and public hearing in October.

Charlotte explores annexation every two years; it's important to keep the city healthy, Charlotte-Mecklenburg planner Bryman Suttle said. In 2007, the city added 4.7 square miles, affecting about 7,100 residents.

If approved, the areas considered now would be annexed in 2009, adding $1.5 billion in real and personal property. It would also allow Charlotte to top the 700,000 population mark, with about 715,500 residents.

Each area meets the legal criteria for annexation, with increasing population density and at least part of each section already connected to the city boundary, Suttle said.

“It's important to stress that this is just the beginning of the process; nothing's been decided,” Suttle said.

“We encourage people to come out and ask questions at these hearings. That's what they're for.”

If annexation is eventually approved, the city would immediately extend police protection, city water and sewer, garbage collection and street maintenance to those areas – and that would bring more development.

Suttle said development and population density drive many areas to qualify for annexation. Often, services such as volunteer fire departments or private garbage collectors can't keep up with demand as more houses are built and more people move into an area.

“When you get to a certain size, you want to be sure those things can be taken care of,” Suttle said.

“You can have unintended circumstances if there's a lack of services.”

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