Food & Drink

Observer story on S.C. barbecue and race gets followed in The New Yorker

The late Maurice Bessinger attracted controversy for his policies on the Confederate flag and racial history in South Carolina.
The late Maurice Bessinger attracted controversy for his policies on the Confederate flag and racial history in South Carolina. Observer files

A Charlotte Observer article on a South Carolina family’s struggle over racially charged material, and barbecue, ended up becoming a story in this week’s New Yorker magazine.

New Yorker writer Lauren Collins, who was recently nominated along with several other writers for a James Beard Award for journalism for last year’s New Yorker food issue, followed up on the story of the late Maurice Bessinger in the magazine’s annual Food & Travel issue. Dated April 24, the issue is available this week. The article, under “Letter From South Carolina,” has the headline “America’s Most Political Food,” and delves into the uncomfortable history that barbecue sometimes has in the South.

The piece that attracted the magazine’s attention noted the Bessinger family’s removal of things such as the Confederate flag and racial materials that once had been sold and displayed inside the restaurant.

Kathleen Purvis: 704-358-5236, @kathleenpurvis

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