If you’ve been watching infomercials or flipping through a magazine lately, you may think testosterone could be a cure-all. The “low T” movement, also known as “andropause,” targets aging men for their declining testosterone levels. And over the past decade, it’s become a multibillion-dollar industry.A new editorial in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, makes the case that “disease mongering” created a surge in the prescribing and the use of testosterone and human growth hormone in the United States.
If you’ve been watching infomercials or flipping through a magazine lately, you may think testosterone could be a cure-all. The “low T” movement, also known as “andropause,” targets aging men for their declining testosterone levels. And over the past decade, it’s become a multibillion-dollar industry.A new editorial in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, makes the case that “disease mongering” created a surge in the prescribing and the use of testosterone and human growth hormone in the United States. Todd Melet
If you’ve been watching infomercials or flipping through a magazine lately, you may think testosterone could be a cure-all. The “low T” movement, also known as “andropause,” targets aging men for their declining testosterone levels. And over the past decade, it’s become a multibillion-dollar industry.A new editorial in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, makes the case that “disease mongering” created a surge in the prescribing and the use of testosterone and human growth hormone in the United States. Todd Melet

Critics say ‘disease mongering’ has created a multibillion-dollar hormone industry

April 06, 2015 02:00 AM