Moms

A few good moms: Can you handle the truth . . . about the truth?

I was reminded of my original goal with this blog – that other moms wouldn’t feel so alone. I fear some of my stories may have come across like a silly pity party for one. I am reminded to look outward, to give others a break, to summon up a little more patience, to be kind.
I was reminded of my original goal with this blog – that other moms wouldn’t feel so alone. I fear some of my stories may have come across like a silly pity party for one. I am reminded to look outward, to give others a break, to summon up a little more patience, to be kind. Getty Images

The mom sits down at her computer to write. She types several words and then deletes them. She glances at the newspaper and winces, and then sighs. Finally, she closes her laptop and says, “I just don’t know.”

You want the truth about “the truth”? I think you can handle it.

This blog is long overdue. It probably should have been the first installment of the series, or maybe an important update after the first few stories. Perhaps it has not happened yet because it feels a little strange to have an entire post consist of a big disclaimer.

Because the truth is . . . I have no idea what the truth is.

Or rather, I don’t know what reality constitutes your truth. I only know my own experience. And if you have read any of my other MomsCharlotte blogs – Worst Mom Ever, Miracle on Curbstone Street, Team Mom – you know that this experience actually has informed a certain anti-expert status.

In keeping with this maladroit theme, I began writing A Few Good Moms with my mistakes in mind. My goal was to pick parenting topics that made me feel like I was messing it all up, and talk about them, and hope maybe another mom wouldn’t feel like she was all alone if she went through the same thing.

Hopefully this has been your experience with the blog. I am sure sometimes I have missed the mark.

This week I was at Target doing the school supply run. My son and I clutched our lists and snaked around the store with our cart, in aisles so hectic I thought they should consider installing traffic lights inside the store. Kids were running everywhere, we couldn’t find some of our items, and we waited and waited to talk to a store employee. Ugh, I thought as a blog formed in my mind. The truth about back-to-school. The truth about school supplies. The truth about Target.

Finally we finished and made our way over to a predictably long check out line. Eventually we noticed that all of the lanes were progressing at a slow but steady clip – except ours. I could feel my blood pressure rising as my son began to drape himself across the cart as though his spine had completely given out.

What is the problem, the woman behind me muttered. I looked ahead to the shopper at the very front checking out and saw that the cashier had finished ringing up all of her items. As I watched, the mom reached over and pulled a few things out. The cashier then tallied her total again. The mom found another coupon and put some school supplies back in. As her total was computed yet another time she stared at the pile to decide what would make the final cut.

I wish I had figured it out fast enough to run to the front of the line and pay for it all, but the truth is, I have no idea if that would have been the right thing to do. I do know that even though I thought my school supply run was done, I have one more pass to make – to deliver straight to Classroom Central.

I was reminded of my original goal with this blog – that other moms wouldn’t feel so alone. I fear some of my stories may have come across like a silly pity party for one. I am reminded to look outward, to give others a break, to summon up a little more patience, to be kind.

I may be sending my boys back to the classroom next week, but the truth is: I am among a few good moms who remain a student in the school of life. Honestly, thank you for your patience.

Want to get a better handle today’s exploration of the truth? Read this piece by Trish Rohr about making a difference, consider making a back-to-school donation to Classroom Central, and remember the ultimate truth as articulated by John Lennon.

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