Going, Going...

10 spots to escape holiday bustle? Maybe, maybe not

FILE - Toni Conger of Statesville, NC, finds a quiet spot on the Roanoke Sound at the end of the Roanoke Trail at the Nags Head Woods Ecological Preserve to sit and play a small flute. She and her husband Ken had been here before, and they stopped by to enjoy the solitude by the water. There are several hiking trails through the 1400 acre maritime forest, but this one ends at the Roanoke Sound.
FILE - Toni Conger of Statesville, NC, finds a quiet spot on the Roanoke Sound at the end of the Roanoke Trail at the Nags Head Woods Ecological Preserve to sit and play a small flute. She and her husband Ken had been here before, and they stopped by to enjoy the solitude by the water. There are several hiking trails through the 1400 acre maritime forest, but this one ends at the Roanoke Sound. The (Raleigh) News & Observer

With the holidays just around the corner, the marketing/data firm Infogroup did a study of which towns are characterized by having a high concentration of hotels.

The inference: These places are prime for getaways during a hectic time of year.

The Infogroup email touted their top-10 list as budget-stretching destinations, given their abundant lodgings options. But that idea most likely isn’t valid. Several on the list are near winter sports areas (Jackson, Wyo., Bennington, Vt.); are outrageously popular/expensive in winter (Key West, Fla.) or tend to close down once the warm-weather tourist season ends (Kill Devil Hills; the Black Hills town of Spearfish, S.D.; the Marthas Vineyard town of Vineyard Haven, Mass.)

Hold on. Was that Kill Devil Hills on the list? Yes. And the roster also includes Sevierville, Tenn., not too far over the N.C. line.

Take a look.

1. Sevierville, Tenn.

2. Branson, Mo.

3. Astoria, Ore.

4. Newport, Ore.

5. Jackson, Wyo./Idaho

6. Key West, Fla.

7. Kill Devil Hills

8. Spearfish, S.D.

9. Bennington, Vt.

10. Vineyard Haven, Mass.

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