News

Observer forum: Letters to editor

In response to “GOP blocks Dunlap selection” (Oct. 22):

Is civil discourse foreign

to GOP commissioners?

Once again, Republican Party leadership talks about the need to clean up government, but the Republicans in office can't seem to manage civil discourse.

I commend George Dunlap for his composure under fire.

Polly Little

Charlotte

Mackey, Leake, Dunlap:

That's some lineup, Dems!

Mackey, Leake, Dunlap – has the Democratic Party had a break with reality?

Cris Owens

Charlotte

In response to “Robin Hayes – caught on tape” (Oct. 21 charlotteobserver.com):

Rep. Hayes, what I hate

is GOP's hatemongering

No, Mr. Hayes. I don't hate real Americans.

I do, however, reserve the right to dislike hatemongering congressmen who try to divide their constituents with the same pathetic rhetoric heard on WBT and in McCain-Palin ads.

Dave Morris

Charlotte

Here's liberal's military record –

where's yours, Mr. Hayes?

I served 28 years in the U.S. Navy – and I'm a liberal!

Please ask Rep. Robin Hayes how many wars he fought in?

Earle Mitchell

Springfield, Va.

‘Liberals hate real Americans':

Claim challenges basic values

Recent Republican comments such as Rep. Robin Hayes' “Liberals hate real Americans” should terrify any American who values the core principles of this nation.

Michael Crawford

Hickory

Who is Hayes to call

my uncle unpatriotic?

My uncle Bill Roberts was a lifelong Franklin D. Roosevelt Democrat, a mountain populist, liberal on social issues, moderate on fiscal issues, a farmer and a magistrate. To my knowledge he never voted for a Republican. He served in the infantry in World War II and engaged in hand-to-hand combat with the Germans.

He would be incensed at being described as unpatriotic.

Just as I am.

Pender McElroy

Charlotte

In response to “Story isn't Joe the Plumber but ‘Spread the wealth' ” (Oct. 19 Forum):

‘Spreading the wealth'

gave us public education

The best example of “spreading the wealth” in the nation's history?

Free public education. Consider what the U.S. would be like if, as was true when the Constitution was adopted, only the wealthy could afford to educate their children.

Who can seriously oppose spreading the wealth?

Timothy D. Mead

Charlotte

‘Giving up piece of pie'

risks inflation, unemployment

Obama's economic strategy is “spread the wealth,” and in the words of his wife “Someone is going to have to give up a piece of their pie so that someone else can have more.”

We will ultimately pay for this socialist policy in inflation and unemployment.

Ann Machen

Charlotte

‘Negative income tax'

rooted in conservatism

The idea of including the working poor in tax cuts by sending them a rebate check even though they pay no income tax originated with conservative icon Milton Friedman. He proposed a “negative income tax” to increase money supply during recessions.

Now Republican politicians are calling such a plan socialism, even communism. Poor Dr. Friedman must be spinning in his grave.

Fred Marsh

Charlotte

In response to “Talk-radio listeners no plus for democratic process” (Oct. 22 Forum):

Talk radio keeps conservatives

on toes between elections

Conservative talk radio thrives while liberal views are scarce because conservatives support this medium year in and year out, realizing our rights are constantly threatened.

Liberals become active only during election years, so they can be taken care of for the next four years, waking only to write checks for more taxes.

John Pahl

Charlotte

In response to “$477 million: Where would the money go?” (Oct. 20):

Community bonds address

needs in good times and bad

This is actually a pretty good time to be supporting community bonds. These bonds are intended to build and improve infrastructure such as roads and parks needed in both good times and bad.

Observer, please endorse all the bonds at your next opportunity.

Christopher J. Perri

Charlotte

In response to “Ask yourself the tough questions” (Oct. 22 Viewpoint):

‘Tough questions'? I see

only gimmes, Mr. Lane

Instead of “tough questions” John Lane offers only a set of unsupported assertions as a setup for easy answers.

While I agree with at least one assertion – I believe in the safety of nuclear power – assertions, even my own, are themselves open to question and require justification before acceptance.

Jim Lang

Charlotte

Columnists need more

behind them than Fox News

John Lane's grasp of the issues leaves a lot to be desired. Perhaps in the future when selecting community columnists, the Observer should inquire as to whether they get their information from somewhere other than Fox News.

Matthew Robertson

Charlotte

Take a bow, Kevin Siers –

you're tops in my book

Kevin Siers is the greatest newspaper caricaturist I've ever seen. He can really draw.

Thanks for his work.

William Tasker

Fort Mill

In response to “Government can't do all, or most of it” (Oct. 22 Viewpoint):

‘Uninformed masses'? That's

your audience, Mr. Thomas

Cal Thomas, of all people, bemoans the “ignorance of the uninformed masses” – without which this Fox News staple would surely be out of a job!

Dan Lewis

Waxhaw

In response to “Gas station owners agree to refunds” (Oct. 21):

Gas station owners who took

advantage deserve penalties

As Attorney General Roy Cooper says, “When families are struggling to make ends meet, the last thing they need is to be gouged at the pump.”

When stations take advantage of high demand and low supply, they're cheating consumers. They deserve to pay these fines and to issue refunds.

Emily Shannon

Charlotte

Stations were doing only

what they had to to survive

Gas stations shouldn't be forced to refund money to customers.

If a station realizes it's going to run out of gas, then it needs to make enough money before the pumps are empty and store sales plummet.

Kate Fialko

Charlotte

In response to “Carve your vote” (Oct. 21):

Repeat after me: Lie, lay, lain…

Lay, laid, laid… Lie, lay, lain….

Your directions tell readers to allow the pattern “to lay flat” on the pumpkin.

As this verb has no object in the sentence, “lie” rather than “lay” should be used.

Although the incorrect use of “lay” has become widespread, let's not contribute to the country's dumbing down.

Kenneth P. Bulard

Charlotte

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