Cory Hymel, director of connected technologies for Enventys, uses an angle grinder to smooth down the rough edge of a piece of steel inside the workshop for industrial designers and engineers. Louis Foreman, CEO of the Charlotte-based product development firm Enventys doesn't want inventors to be discouraged from defending their intellectual property. But Foreman believes a bipartisan bill in Congress called the Innovation Act could do just that by requiring those who lose patent-infringement cases to pay legal fees.
Cory Hymel, director of connected technologies for Enventys, uses an angle grinder to smooth down the rough edge of a piece of steel inside the workshop for industrial designers and engineers. Louis Foreman, CEO of the Charlotte-based product development firm Enventys doesn't want inventors to be discouraged from defending their intellectual property. But Foreman believes a bipartisan bill in Congress called the Innovation Act could do just that by requiring those who lose patent-infringement cases to pay legal fees. Daniel Cordero DANIEL CORDERO
Cory Hymel, director of connected technologies for Enventys, uses an angle grinder to smooth down the rough edge of a piece of steel inside the workshop for industrial designers and engineers. Louis Foreman, CEO of the Charlotte-based product development firm Enventys doesn't want inventors to be discouraged from defending their intellectual property. But Foreman believes a bipartisan bill in Congress called the Innovation Act could do just that by requiring those who lose patent-infringement cases to pay legal fees. Daniel Cordero DANIEL CORDERO

Lawmakers hope to rein in ‘patent trolls’

April 25, 2015 07:30 AM