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AT&T customers in south Charlotte frustrated by 2-week delay in repair for cut landline

Workers accidentally cut an AT&T cable this month, leaving some customers near East Woodlawn and Park roads without access to their landline phones for almost two weeks.
Workers accidentally cut an AT&T cable this month, leaving some customers near East Woodlawn and Park roads without access to their landline phones for almost two weeks. AP

Workers accidentally cut an AT&T cable this month, leaving some customers near East Woodlawn and Park roads without access to their landline phones for almost two weeks.

Lightower Fiber Networks hit an AT&T cable on June 8 while preparing for a fiber installation, according to the Charlotte Department of Transportation.

AT&T would not say how many customers were affected. But on Tuesday morning some customers were still without their landline.

“Factors including the location, the number and depth of cables and the scope of work required has complicated completing the repairs as fast as we would like,” an AT&T spokesperson said. “Service is restoring for some customers, and technicians will remain on site until repairs are completed and service is fully restored.”

A spokesperson for Lightower Fiber Networks said the company notified a program that informs other companies of digging plans but that AT&T did not mark the cable that was cut. AT&T said it is currently investigating whether it had marked the line.

Sharon Jones, one of the customers affected by the outage, said AT&T is taking too long to fix the problem. She said AT&T has pushed back the date of when the problem would be fixed three times.

“The problem is they’re not proactive in letting customers know when it’ll be restored,” she said. Customers have to contact AT&T, according to Jones, because they haven’t been calling to let people know about the issue.

“I use my landline a lot,” she said. “So it’s been a huge inconvenience.”

Lightower is one of many telecommunications companies installing fiber around Charlotte as consumers and businesses demand faster Internet speeds. Google Fiber, for example, is laying thousands of miles of cable around the city, which has spurred some complaints from residents.

Rachel Stone: 704-358-5334, @RStone1317

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