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Carolinas Roundup |

Developer stops sales of units

at troubled condo building

With no end in sight to the legal troubles surrounding the stalled 210 Trade condo building, its onsite sales team has moved out.

In a letter to condo owners last week, Builder Services Inc., an arm of Allen Tate, said the team was leaving the sales office, citing “issues … in the court system, thus temporarily curtailing our ability to sell property at this location.”

The company plans to monitor the building's progress and update buyers through a Web site it created for them, the letter said.

Questions about the move were referred to a spokesman for the developer, Charlotte FC, part of the Indianapolis-based Flaherty & Collins. He did not immediately return phone calls Thursday.

Charlotte FC will not sell more units until the legal issues are resolved, its attorney, Lee Spinks, said.

Work on the 50-story tower, part of the EpiCentre complex uptown, stopped in February, with two floors built, because of a disagreement over technical building-code issues.

Its developer and the EpiCentre's, Pacific Avenue, part of the Charlotte-based Ghazi Co., have filed lawsuits against each other, alleging various breaches of contract that led to the stalemate.

Both sides have said they want the project to move forward. The latest contract gives developers until December 2010, with the option to extend up to four months beyond that, to finish the building.

Spinks said Charlotte FC hopes construction can be started in time to meet the deadline and that the developer will let buyers know when that will be – or if it's unable to start construction in coming months.

Kirsten Valle

CMC-NorthEast regains status as trauma center

After voluntarily dropping its designation as a trauma center last year, Carolinas Medical Center-NorthEast has received word from state officials that its Level III trauma status has been reinstated.

An inspection last year found “process issues” that had to be addressed before the state would continue to designate the Concord hospital as a trauma center, according to the N.C. Office of Emergency Medical Services.

Issues in question included quality assurance procedures and the need to demonstrate more administrative support for the program.

Patient care was not in question.

Reinstatement followed the state's re-inspection of CMC-NorthEast in late August.

The Concord hospital merged with the much-larger Carolinas HealthCare System in July 2007. State officials said it's common after a change in management for hospitals to need time to refocus and make sure management is in place to support the trauma center.

Carolinas Medical Center, the Charlotte flagship of the hospital system, has been a designated Level I center, the highest level, since 1989.

Karen Garloch

Novant gains physicians from HMA

More than 85 doctors have joined Novant Health since Aug. 1, as the result of a joint venture between Novant and Health Management Associates in March.

This week, Novant Medical Group announced the addition of 41 doctors from former HMA practices based in Chester, Gaffney, Hamlet and Louisburg.

Last month, 45 physicians from HMA practices in Mooresville, Statesville and Hartsville also joined Novant, in the first phase of the transition.

Physician assistants and nurse practitioners from each practice have also joined Novant, the Winston-Salem based hospital group that owns Presbyterian Healthcare.

Novant, a not-for-profit, purchased a minority share of all seven HMA hospitals in the Carolinas for $300 million. As part of the agreement, Novant shares governance of the joint venture with the for-profit HMA, of Naples, Fla. HMA will continue to manage the hospitals. HMA physicians could choose to join Novant.

The joint venture includes four hospitals in the Charlotte region: Lake Norman Regional Medical Center in Mooresville; Davis Regional Medical Center in Statesville; Chester Regional Medical Center in Chester, S.C.; and Upstate Carolina Medical Center in Gaffney, S.C.

The seven hospitals have a total of 711 beds.

Karen Garloch
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