Banking

What happened to Wells Fargo CEO’s hand?

John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo, raises his hand as he is sworn in to testify about the unauthorized opening of accounts by Wells Fargo during a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on Capitol Hill.
John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo, raises his hand as he is sworn in to testify about the unauthorized opening of accounts by Wells Fargo during a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on Capitol Hill. AFP/Getty Images

Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf faced withering questions from the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday, and he did it with a bandaged right hand and wrist.

Stumpf, 63, hurt his hand playing with his grandchildren, Wells spokeswoman Jennifer Dunn told the Observer. She said she didn’t know the severity of the injury or when it happened.

The San Francisco-based bank, which has its largest employee hub in Charlotte, is under fire after the bank agreed to pay $185 million in fines to settle claims that its employees opened up hundreds of thousands of accounts without customer consent to meet sales goals.

Stumpf’s bandaged appendage was highly visible during the hearing, including when he raised it to be sworn in as a witness.

In his testimony, Stumpf told the panel that he accepts “full responsibility” for unethical sales practices in the bank’s retail division. He faced a call to resign from Massachusetts Democrat Elizabeth Warren before his portion of the hearing ended at 12:45 p.m.

Wells Fargo chairman and CEO John Stumpf​ ​testified Tuesday in front of the ​​Senate Banking​ ​Committee​ ​about the bank's allegedly illegal sales practices.

Rick Rothacker: 704-358-5170, @rickrothacker

Related stories from Charlotte Observer

  Comments