Bank Watch

Survey: North Carolinians say Trump would be best for them financially

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses the South Carolina Tea Party Convention in Myrtle Beach on Jan. 16. Results from a survey released Wednesday show North Carolinians prefer Trump on the question of which candidate would be best for them financially.
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses the South Carolina Tea Party Convention in Myrtle Beach on Jan. 16. Results from a survey released Wednesday show North Carolinians prefer Trump on the question of which candidate would be best for them financially. AFP/Getty Images

When it comes to the question of which presidential candidate would be best for Americans’ finances, North Carolinians are putting their money on The Donald.

GOBankingRates.com said Wednesday that Republican Donald Trump is the preferred candidate in North Carolina based on a survey that asked “Which presidential candidate would be best for you financially if elected?”

Democrats Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton placed second and third, respectively, in the state.

Nationwide, Trump was also the top candidate, favored by 29 percent of respondents, who were given six candidates to chose from. Here’s how the others fared nationally:

Sanders, 26 percent

Clinton, 20 percent

Ted Cruz, 9 percent

Marco Rubio, 8 percent

Ben Carson, 8 percent

Of the 7,728 Americans surveyed, 37 percent picked “none of the above.”

Elyssa Kirkham, a writer for the personal-finance website, said in a statement that many Americans remain dissatisfied with slow-growing wages, high taxes and other fiscal policies affecting their bank accounts.

The survey’s results, Kirkham said, show that many candidates are offering solutions for creating greater financial security that voters find favorable.

North Carolina, the website notes, voted Republican in six of the past seven presidential elections.

The exception was 2008, the year Democrat Barack Obama was elected to his first term. Obama failed to carry the state during his re-election bid four years later.

Trump’s platform includes eliminating the “death tax,” also known as the estate tax, which is levied on the wealth a person leaves to heirs after death. His plan also calls for no income taxes on people who are single and earn less than $25,000, or on those who are married and jointly earn less than $50,000.

Critics have said his tax plan will increase the deficit and benefit very wealthy individuals.

GoBankingRates.com said its survey had a margin of error of 3 percent and was conducted Dec. 10-16.

Deon Roberts: 704-358-5248, @DeonERoberts

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