Bank Watch

PNC Bank to upgrade ATMs in Charlotte, elsewhere

PNC Bank said it is upgrading its automated teller machines in the Charlotte region and elsewhere, so they can accept new credit and debit cards embedded with security microchips. The bank said other changes it’s making to the ATMs include screens with easier-to-read buttons and adding the option for customers to receive emailed receipts.
PNC Bank said it is upgrading its automated teller machines in the Charlotte region and elsewhere, so they can accept new credit and debit cards embedded with security microchips. The bank said other changes it’s making to the ATMs include screens with easier-to-read buttons and adding the option for customers to receive emailed receipts. spompeii@herald-leader.com

PNC Bank said it is upgrading its automated teller machines in the Charlotte region and elsewhere, so they can accept new credit and debit cards embedded with security microchips.

Many banks’ customers across the U.S. have already been issued the chip cards, meant to be harder to counterfeit than traditional cards with only a black magnetic strip on the back.

This week, Pittsburgh-based PNC announced it is pushing to upgrade all 9,000 of its U.S. ATMs by Oct. 1, when liability for fraud involving MasterCard-branded cards shifts to ATM owners. The liability shift for Visa-branded cards is scheduled for October 2017.

PNC, the ninth-largest bank by deposits in Charlotte, said it plans to upgrade all 161 ATMs in its western Carolina region. That area, which includes Charlotte, roughly runs from Asheville to Greensboro and down to upstate South Carolina.

In addition to upgrading ATMs to accept the new cards, PNC said it is adding protective keypad shields to many of the machines. The shields are designed to help hide customers’ personal identification numbers.

The bank said other changes it’s making to the ATMs include screens with easier-to-read buttons and adding the option for customers to receive emailed receipts.

Even as banks report rising amounts of customer transactions on mobile phones and declining foot traffic into branches, ATMs remain widely used.

The machines are the second-most common method for customers to interact with a financial institution, behind in-person visits to branches, according to a March report by the Federal Reserve.

Deon Roberts: 704-358-5248, @DeonERoberts

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