Development

Atherton Mill redevelopment gets nod from Design Review Committee

An aerial view from the northeast of a planned new building with apartments and retail next to the historic Parks-Cramer mill building at Atherton Mill. South Boulevard is in the foreground and the Blue Line light rail is behind the new building.
An aerial view from the northeast of a planned new building with apartments and retail next to the historic Parks-Cramer mill building at Atherton Mill. South Boulevard is in the foreground and the Blue Line light rail is behind the new building.

Big changes are coming to South End’s Atherton Mill, and the redevelopment plans got the OK from the Historic Landmarks Commission’s Design Review Committee on Wednesday.

Owner Edens is planning to overhaul the site and add apartments, shops and more parking. The first phase of the redevelopment includes renovating and overhauling the tenant lineup at the Parks-Cramer building (the historic mill portion of the site). Edens has signed tenants including Free People, Anthropologie, high-end sushi restaurant O-Ku and Warby Parker, the fashionable glasses retailer.

The next phase will include demolishing many of the buildings on the four-acre southern part of the site and adding 60,000 square feet new shops and restaurants, five stories of apartments with 359 units and additional parking. The historic “Trolley Barn” building along the Blue Line light rail will remain and be reused.

The Design Review Commission looked at the conceptual designs for the new construction slated for the southern part of the Atherton Mill site. The group approved the design concept and the full Historic Landmarks Commission will vote on the plans Nov. 14.

You can see more details, site plans and renderings of the Atherton Mill redevelopment posted online here. Check out a description of the new building below (Warning: Jargon ahead):

“The new building that faces the Parks-Cramer Building, and crosses the historic site boundary, is set back from the Landmark structure, and from the Trolley Barn building. A section of the building has been carved back facing the Parks-Cramer building along a newly created streetwall, effectively creating two separate building volumes. The corner building volume toward South Boulevard follows a historical archetype of multi-level masonry industrial buildings of the 1920’s. Utilizing modular masonry, corbels and wall profiles in conjunction with retail storefronts protected by a steel canopy, the new building architecture effectively transitions from the unique, low-scale Parks-Cramer complex. The second building volume nearest the trolley trail and Trolley Barn is comprised of materials with clean lines, subtle textures and light colors.”

Ely Portillo: 704-358-5041, @ESPortillo

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