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What’s cooking in SouthPark? Wednesdays bring food truck options

Here are some happenings involving Charlotte-area entrepreneurs:

• SouthPark Eats Alternative – billed as the largest gathering of food trucks in the area – continues Wednesday at 11 a.m. with an eight-truck lineup in the Fairview Plaza parking lot.



An estimated 500 hungry customers attended last week’s debut. “People were turning away and leaving, the lines were so long,” according to Tabitha Flythe, manager of marketing and promotions for developers American Asset Corporation.

“Our turn out … was fantastic. … It far and above exceeded our expectations.”

American Asset is sponsoring the Wednesday weekly food fest and hosting it at its Fairview Plaza property, 5960 Fairview Road.

Today’s lineup is expected to include King of Pops, Roaming Fork, Southern Cake Queen, Belly Backers, Master Bacon, Imperial Sandwich Co., Wingzza and Libretto's Pizzeria. Service runs until 2 p.m. For information and updates, go to www.sea-nc.com.

• The team planning to bring

Capishe! Bold Italian Kitchen

to Charlotte this year said last week they are optimistic about finding the right location soon. The new, fast-casual Italian food concept involves

Bruce Willette

, founder of the Charlotte-based Salsarita’s Fresh Cantina, and Johnson & Wales Chef on Assignment

Peter Reinhart

.



In the meantime, Reinhart, a renowned baking expert and cookbook author, remains involved in a creative option to market himself – as an instructor for the online site Craftsy. The Denver-based online destination site for makers, launched in 2011, features hundreds of classes in quilting, sewing, knitting, photography and more, and claims 4 million members. Members sign up for video classes that they can access for life.

Reinhart filmed two courses for Craftsy. He said his “ Artisan Bread Making” class, for $39.99, has more than 12,000 members, and his free “ Perfect Pizza at Home” class has more than 90,000 signed up. Reinhart said the bread-making class was filmed two years ago at Johnson & Wales.

Reinhart says his business relationship with Craftsy works similarly to his connection with publishers: Craftsy owns the courses, and instructors are paid an advance. He receives royalties based on a percentage of sales of the course.

Since the online venue also include bios of instructors, Craftsy classes also provide a way for instructors to market themselves and their books. “It’s good for an author to stay in the public eye,” he said.

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