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End of Daylight SavingTime means watch out on roads

Dan LaMoore wipes down a Shinola clock at Electric Time Co. in Medfield, Mass., on Thursday. Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. local time Sunday, when clocks are set back one hour.
Dan LaMoore wipes down a Shinola clock at Electric Time Co. in Medfield, Mass., on Thursday. Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. local time Sunday, when clocks are set back one hour. AP

The end of Daylight Saving Time this weekend means extra vigilance on roads.

In North Carolina, November averages more crashes than any other month – 25,296 wrecks were reported last November in the state.

More than 20 percent of crashes in the state last year happened in November and December, according to the state Department of Transportation.

Driving either just before sunrise or immediately at dusk are the most dangerous times, with traffic fatalities three times more likely, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

A key problem is that while the sky is still lit, the roads begin to get dark. That causes a disparity between light and dark, which creates vision problems for some drivers, state transportation officials said.

Glare from the rising or setting sun and from headlights in the darkened afternoon poses another problem, as it reduces the ability to see clearly.

Glare can increase a driver’s reaction time because of its three- to five-second effect on vision, which may cause drivers to suddenly slow down or drift in their lane, the state DOT said.

Joe Marusak: 704-358-5067, @jmarusak

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