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Was this teen whose remains were found in 1973 from the Carolinas?

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children has created a 3D facial reconstruction of the teen using a CT scan of the skull found in Pennsylvania in 1973.
The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children has created a 3D facial reconstruction of the teen using a CT scan of the skull found in Pennsylvania in 1973. National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

Recent scientific testing on the remains of a teenage girl that were found in Pennsylvania in 1973 show she was likely from the Southeast, possibly the Carolinas, according to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.

On Oct. 10, 1973, the body of a young woman was found on the Edward Martin Military Reserve in Fort Indiantown Gap, Pa. She is known only as Jane Doe.

An anthropological exam has concluded the teen had been dead for up to three weeks, the center announced Thursday. The teen was white, possibly of southeast European descent and 16 to 19 years old. She was 5-feet-5 to 5-feet-8 inches tall, the exam showed.

No cause or manner of death could be determined, according to the center.

The center facilitated a chemical isotope analysis on the remains through the University of South Florida’s Forensic Anthropology Center and associate professor Erin Kimmerle.

The analysis concluded she was probably born and raised in the Southeast, including central-east Texas, eastern Oklahoma, Arkansas, southern Missouri, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, central and southern West Virginia, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas, southern and eastern Virginia into southern Maryland and Delaware shores.

The center created a 3D facial reconstruction of the teen using a CT scan of the skull found in Pennsylvania in 1973.

Anyone with information about Jane Doe is urged to call the Pennsylvania State Police at 717-865-2194 or the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at 1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-842-5678).

Joe Marusak: 704-358-5067, @jmarusak

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