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Hurricane Jose could still cause problems in N.C.

Hurricane Irma: Polluted flood water flows through houses in a Florida neighborhood

News & Observer photojournalist Travis Long uses a drone to capture the post-Hurricane Irma flooding in a neighborhood in Bonita Springs, Florida.
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News & Observer photojournalist Travis Long uses a drone to capture the post-Hurricane Irma flooding in a neighborhood in Bonita Springs, Florida.

Hurricane Jose, a pale followup to Category 5 Irma, could churn up North Carolina’s coast with tropical-force winds and dangerous surf by this weekend, forecasters said.

Jose is a Category 1 storm in the Atlantic generating 75 mph sustained winds, barely hurricane strength. It’s 445 miles east of the Bahamas and moving slowly west at 3 mph.

The National Hurricane Center expects Jose to veer northeast later Thursday in an arc that keeps it off the East coast.

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Tropical storm-force winds from Hurricane Jose could reach the N.C. coast by Sunday morning. National Hurricane Center

But swells from the storm are expected to affect Bermuda, the Bahamas, the northern coasts of Hispaniola and Puerto Rico and the Southeast coast over the next several days.

“These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions,” center officials said.

The hurricane center shows tropical storm-force winds affecting the central and northern North Carolina coast by Sunday morning. It places Jose’s expected path off the Carolina coast by Tuesday morning.

The entire East Coast should keep an eye on Jose as it meanders through the Atlantic over the next week, according to AccuWeather.

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Hurricane Jose could whip up potentially dangerous surf conditions and exacerbate beach erosion from Hurricane Irma. AccuWeather

“The strength and frequency of rip currents will increase at a time when many lifeguards are no longer on duty and people may head to the beach to take advantage of building warmth,” the weather company’s forecasters wrote.

“Beach erosion that was inflicted by Irma along the southern Atlantic seaboard and persistent winds from non-tropical systems in the mid-Atlantic could be exacerbated.”

Rip currents are powerful, narrow channels of fast-moving water. Rip currents account for 80% of beach rescues, and can be dangerous or deadly if you don't know what to do. This video from NOAA Ocean Today shows you how to break the grip of the ri

Bruce Henderson: 704-358-5051, @bhender

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