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Was Carolinas native Andrew Jackson a ‘butcher,’ ‘monster’ and ‘mass murderer’?

With a portrait of President Andrew Jackson hanging in the background, President Donald Trump, right, speaks during a meeting with Navajo Code Talkers including Thomas Begay, left, and Peter MacDonald, center, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017.
With a portrait of President Andrew Jackson hanging in the background, President Donald Trump, right, speaks during a meeting with Navajo Code Talkers including Thomas Begay, left, and Peter MacDonald, center, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017. AP

When President Donald Trump honored a group of Native American war heroes this week, the event was staged in front of a White House portrait of Carolinas native Andrew Jackson, who is not exactly revered by Indigenous Americans.

The resulting backlash has provided a view into Jackson’s shrinking status as one of the nation’s greatest presidents.

Social media posts referred to him as a monster, Indian killer, butcher and “the father of ethnic cleansing.” He was even likened to Adolf Hitler.

North Carolina has long taken pride in calling Jackson a native son. He was born in 1767 in the Waxhaw area of Union County, but the lack of an exact spot has led both North and South Carolina to claim him. (A 360-acre park is named in his honor in Lancaster County.)

The Washington Post gave a mostly negative perspective of Jackson’s legacy in a Wednesday story under the headline: “Andrew Jackson was called ‘Indian killer.’ Trump honored Navajos in front of his portrait.”

“As president from 1829 to 1837, Jackson is perhaps most famous for his pivotal role in Native Americans’ painful and violent history in the United States,” wrote the Post. “He signed the Indian Removal Act in 1830, which forced the relocation of more than 60,000 Native Americans to clear the way for white pioneers. The act helped lead to the ‘Trail of Tears,’ in which an estimated 4,000 Cherokee died during the harsh conditions of a long march during a forced relocation in 1838 and 1839.”

Here’s what they’re saying about Jackson on social media this week:

VIDEO: A loud and colorful moving celebration of Native American heritage came to UNC's Fetzer Gym Saturday, March 5, 2016 for the 29th annual Carolina Indian Circle Powwow. Over a thousand were expected for a full six hours of dancing, singing, d

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